Jonathan Quick Sochi Olympic Mask Backplate 2Jonathan Quick was forced to cover up the phrase “Support Our Troops” from his mask for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.

Quick found a better way to support them for the 2014 Sochi Olympics.

The Los Angeles Kings goaltender had long-time personal painter Steve Nash of EyeCandyAir paint a portrait of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on the backplate of his new mask for the upcoming Winter Games.

The painting – and all of Nash’s masks are created by hand using only traditional methods and tools like a pencil, paintbrush and airbrush – was based on part of a U.S. Army Photo taken by Sgt. Jose A. Torres Jr. that was shared with EyeCandyAir by the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), who maintain a 24-hour vigil at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, VA.  

The hand-painted portrait was already approved by the International Olympic Committee, so this military tribute shouldn’t cause Quick any problems.
As for the rest of the mask, Quick added an American flavour to the signature “Battle Armour” look that EyeCandyAir designed for him.
The chin features the logo the U.S. Hockey team will wear on their jerseys – it isn’t an official USA Hockey logo, which would be a no-no under IOC rules for both the jersey and the mask – bolted onto the battle armour, which had red-and-blue tones added throughout, with “USA” and a couple more stars added on the forehead.
Nash has added a nice American touch to Quick’s signature design, one made all the more patriotic by what’s on the back.
You can check out more of Nash’s work on the official EyeCandyAir website, or follow them on TwitterFacebook, and on Vine, which includes a couple of tease videos during the making of Quick’s new mask. In the meantime, enjoy more close-ups of the Olympic mask:
 

Jonathan Quick Sochi Olympic Mask Backplate 2

 

Jonathan Quick 2014 Sochi Olympic Mask front

 

Jonathan Quick 2014 Sochi Olympic Mask right

 

Jonathan Quick 2014 Sochi Olympic Mask left

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7 Responses to Tomb of Unknown Soldier on Quick’s Olympic Mask

  1. Mike says:

    Nice mask. Keeps his personal design, but puts the USA crest in the spot where his name would be, a clear message it’s all about the team representing their country.
    Backplate, what’s not to like, well done.

  2. Adam says:

    Not sure I get it. Why do a medieval knight mask? Has nothing to do with the United States.

    Miller’s mask definitely take’s the cake.

    • Thought the U.S. military reference on the backplate was clear: the Tomb of the Unknowns is a well-known military monument dedicated to American service members who have died without their remains being identified.
      It’s a strong tribute to the U.S. military in our humble opinion.

    • Brian says:

      It’s the same mask he wears all the time with the exception of the USA logo and backplate. Probably more of a superstition thing than anything. The subtle addition of the red/white/blue is nice. The backplate is hands down the best tribute. It’s not always about completely changing your identity, he added the colors and the backplate is remarkable. Not everyone likes to change their look, so that’s why he is sticking with what works for him is my guess. Mask looks great.

    • Dawn says:

      Okay I have no proof of this, but the knight mask seems reasonable to me.

      The medieval knight mask is a nod to his hockey team – the Kings. Goalies guard and defend the net (which could be interpreted as “the kingdom”) and a knight guards and defends the kingdom, Kingdoms are ruled by…. Kings.

  3. Cathy says:

    A great mask and a beautiful tribute.

  4. lordheaton says:

    It is a great tribute to those true heroes in our society from the past,present and future. Whom without we would not be able to enjoy the freedoms we enjoy.

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