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How To Fix Canada’s Goalie Development Woes

How To Fix Canada’s Goalie Development Woes

Looking at the list of goaltenders that are considered ‘elite’ or ‘top tier’ – both at the prospect level and the pro level – it appears that Canadian goaltending isn’t as dominant as it once was.

Maybe that’s because the NHL has opened its doors to a higher number of foreign skaters in recent years. More likely, it’s because other countries are surpassing Canadian goaltending development from the beginning.

The reason why? It’s hard to put a finger on, but it’s there.

JonElkin

Arizona Coyotes’ goaltending coach Jon Elkin believes that development begins with athleticism, and that’s where Canadian goalies fall behind.

Arizona Coyotes goaltending coach Jon Elkin pointed out that it comes down to two things; a departure from routine and a higher emphasis on a player’s athleticism over technical structure at an earlier age.

“Foundation is important for everybody,” suggested Elkin, “but you can be taught that. Athleticism needs to be developed early on.

That’s why you see the guys like my student Mackenzie Blackwood; he didn’t become a goaltender until later, he was a forward first. Those guys get a more solid athletic foundation and that’s important.”

He thinks that the Canadian goaltending system has become both too technically based and too grinding. Players in the United States and Europe often participate in other sports and physical activities in the off-season, and it keeps them both well-rounded athletically and from burning out with the same routine day after day. In Canada, even the off-season can be tough on young goaltenders, with nothing but goaltending camps and summer leagues and extra on-ice training. To Elkin, that’s where Canada is starting to fall behind.

InGoal even published a feature on Braden Holtby last year when he revealed that he wasn’t allowed to become a full-time goaltender until he was 12 years old, further proving Elkin’s point.

Of course, some American goaltenders themselves have an interesting and unique perspective – including Connor Hellebuyck of the Winnipeg Jets.

Hellebuyck played high school hockey before heading to the NAHL, where he spent one season prior to his NCAA play. The rest, so they say, is history; the young Michigan-based goaltender spent two seasons with the University of Massachusetts-Lowell before he went pro, and now he’s one of the most exciting young goaltenders to come out of the United States.

He thinks a lot of credit deserves to be given to the path many American goaltenders take to the pros.

“The NAHL has so many teams that the talent is more diluted,” suggested Hellebuyck. “Leagues like that can help a goaltender because you aren’t on a team full of stars; you’re learning to develop behind maybe a struggling defensive system that can’t always handle the good scoring on another club. In the CHL, you’re still facing great shots, but you aren’t getting as much variety in the kinds of shots you may face and the kinds of teams you may be playing behind. That makes the jump to the AHL more foreign than for a guy who’s maybe spent some time in the NAHL or USHL, maybe some time in high school, then some time in the NCAA before he hits the pros.”

Whether it’s the types of systems a goaltender works with or the kinds of shots they’re facing, though, both Elkin and Hellebuyck thought that teams who drafted from the NCAA and the European leagues gave themselves a beneficial cushion that other teams may not be afforded.

“If you have a goaltender in the NCAA, it gives you that extra couple of years before you have to find a spot for them in the system,” suggested Elkin. “It’s the same as drafting a goaltender who wants to spend some time in a European league.”

Of course, Canadian goaltenders can still play NCAA. They hurt themselves in this regard, though, with the continued stand-off between the CHL and the NCAA – as major junior hockey players aren’t eligible for NCAA play once they hit that age.

Can this be fixed?

Elkin said it’s already starting to trend towards a fix in the Canadian goaltending development systems. The United States was able to catch up in goaltending because of the technology age, with more opportunities for aspiring coaches to access the materials they need to become great. That, said Elkin, is going to be what saves Canadian goaltending as well.

“You have Centre Ice, so you can now see games for every team, and you have access to so much information both on the web and on the TV. The goaltending community is already so inter-locked, but this gives developing coaches more information to work with successfully.”

Jonathan Quick

Jonathan Quick is a prime example of the wave of American goaltending talent that is currently flooding the NHL.

It’s certainly going to help that the successful American programs are garnering more attention. Players like Hellebuyck are no longer the exception to the rule when it comes to United States development; Ben Bishop, Jonathan Quick, Cory Schneider, John Gibson, Thatcher Demko, and Scott Darling are all prime examples of American-born goaltenders that have become household names. As these players are exposed to the spotlight, their path to the pros will be considered more and more acceptable – even recommended. American goaltending will become a part of the conversation as a worldwide example for how successful netminders are trained, and that should help Canadian goaltending simply by proxy.

The biggest thing they’ll need to change, though? Elkin thinks it’s how they develop in the first place.

“You can always work with a goaltender on their technique,” he suggested. “Athleticism is much harder to improve, though, without a solid foundation.

Canadian goaltending fell behind when they failed to address that.”

About The Author

Cat Silverman

Catherine is the first American in a long line of Canadians, making her the black sheep before she even decided she wasn't going to be a Leafs fan. Writer for Today's Slapshot, InGoal Magazine, and Coyotes.NHL.com, coach in the Arizona Coyotes Department of Hockey Development. Goalies are not voodoo.

20 Comments

  1. Chris Grant

    My son is a 10 yr old goalie. In my opinion the lack of development of Canadian goalies is because of the lack of coaching. Teams in minor hockey that have a specific goalie coach are few and far between. Players are coached on skating, shooting, etc. but goalies are most often left without any coaching. When my son made 8A1 his coach called me and asked if I was a goalie and when I said I am not he said that is too bad because none of the coaches on his team know how to coach a goalie. If he moves up to AA next year the program he will play in has no goalie development, goalie parents are left on their own to pay for expensive goalie training outside of the minor hockey system. It is not a coincidence that Sweden and Finland are producing top line goalies, both countries have goalie specific coaching for all goalies that starts at an early age. Better development of goalies in Canada requires a commitment from minor hockey programs to invest in goalie specific coaching programs available to all goalies in their systems

    Reply
    • Richard St-Onge

      I conquer on the lack of coaches out there. I witness many teams practicing their goalies with simply buckets of shots, zero technique and situational coverage. Even when I’m hired to coach some goalies during a practice, once I’m out of the way and full team drills ensue, much of the exercises do a huge diservice to the goalies. Education and awareness is the only way to rectafy the matter in my opinion.

      Reply
  2. PK

    Most arguments in this article are personal opinions that are not supported by numbers. Personally I also believe it’s good for kids to play different sports for fun, but there is just no scientific evidence that early specialization in hockey (and sport in general) is harmful for the professional development in that sport. Also, there is absolutely no evidence that Canadian goaltending has “fallen behind”. Here are the hard numbers: the ratio of Canada/US goaltenders in the NHL this year is essentially the same as the ratio of Canada/USA players (2:1). Oh, and by the way, a reference to Braden Holtby (who is Canadian and went through CHL) is laughable in the context of an article that tries to sell the idea that something is supposedly wrong with Canadian goaltending and that the NCAA path is supposedly better for goalie development than the CHL path.

    Reply
    • goalieboy

      Amen brother – amen. Junk “science” at best to suggest the sky is falling and Canadian goalies are lagging – take a look at the NHL numbers. We’re still #1 by a loooong shot. Hey look, the sky isn’t falling after all….

      Reply
  3. Richard St-Onge

    Reading the title, I was hoping that the article in itself would go more indepth on actual ways to approach and develop athleticism and tools that could be easily used for the non-experts out there trying to do their best to learn.

    Instead, it turns out to be a blog on how the CHL and NCAA differ in mapping your way up to the pros.

    John Elkin is an experienced guy. His being hired by the Coyotes is evidence to that. I guess I expected more in this one than I read. Sorry.

    Reply
  4. Bob smith

    Im my opinion, I think the Canadian goaltending system in Canada is corrupt. It’s not about who’s good or talented anymore. It’s either if you’ve got size, have a lot of cash, or you know someone high up. As a former junior goaltender, I know so many goalies who don’t even deserve to be playing where they are.

    Reply
    • goalieboy

      ok Bob – it’s that stuff and not talent that gets our boys to the show..rave on man.

      Reply
  5. Ron

    My perspective, as a former goalie (playing AAA from Atom Minor to Midget and Junior A) and now coaching is that our failure in Canada is too much hockey. When I was young we played other sports in the summer (for me is was baseball and lacrosse) which to Jon’s point worked to develop a more rounded athlete. I strongly encourage the young goalies, and their parents, that I work with to spend the summer’s playing other sports. I support young goalies attending a (singular) week long camp and then ramping ice time up leading prior to the start of the season. Twelve months of hockey is counter-productive. This helps prevents ice burnout and works other athletic skill sets.

    Reply
    • Mike

      You are so right. Since my son has started playing lacrosse and mountain biking in the summers he has started showing diversity in his play. Your on point.

      Reply
  6. Mike

    Depends on the town. I so thankful this year that my son actually has a goalie coach. First time ever and he is an 04. A huge difference I can’t even explain what a difference a goalie coach has made this year, not just on the ice but off the ice as well. He is so much more disciplined with his training, movement, position, nutrition, and doing off ice conditioning on his own. I’m a goalie as well but hearing it from someone else is working so much better than a parent trying to coach their kid.

    Reply
  7. Paul Ipolito

    The pressure you put on your kids to win is what is wrong with your system. Exhibit “A” Mark Visentin. Exhibit “B” Mackenzie Blackwood.

    Reply
  8. Larry Rising

    The biggest bonus in my eyes to the NCAA path is the valuable education that our youth need to succeed in life after hockey. The percentage of goaltenders who actually make the pros is minimal at best. Education is the key to there future, not hockey.

    Reply
  9. Ralph

    I agree with the other comments. Having played AAA hockey and college I didn’t have a actual goalie coach until I was 14! My parent didn’t have the $ to put me in camps so I learned it on my own as well as a lot of bad habits as well. Now I have a 7 year old who skates out 2 x a week and plays goal 2 x a week. On skating nights he has 5 coaches showing him what to do and on goal night its just get in the net and get shot at and their expected to know what they are doing. Not one coach has any advice. So I work with him and send him to a lesson every week and we do some camps in the offseason. and yes I agree he plays soccer and baseball in the summer as I shut him down except for his 1 week goalie camp. It hasn’t changed in the 30 years since I played. Non of the youth/squirt programs get any goaltending worth anything. Finland and Sweden continue to dominate and as others have mentioned they start with goalie coaches in the youth league

    Reply
  10. Rob Napolitano

    Very interesting discussion. I am the parent of a 17 year old, US goaltender who was playing in the USPHL Junior system, and just recently decided to call it quits. Frankly, I believe it was due to burnout as he was the victim (by his own choice) to 12 months of hockey, including group goalie lessons, since the age of 11-12. Time consuming and extremely costly. Hard to say whether diversity in sports would have kept him motivated. He cited that he is tired of sitting (team rotates goalies), and doesn’t see any point to continuing as he does want to commit the time and effort required to play at a D3 school. Lessons learned. There is no right or wrong answer. Goaltending is highly competitive. It takes a great deal of work and patience. I told him if and when the passion or fun goes away, its time to do something else. I was selfishly hoping for a year or two more (enjoy watching him compete), but have no issue with his decision. I am sure he will find something equally rewarding and fun to keep him busy. More focus on his studies v. practices/travel is added plus.

    Reply
  11. Pasco Valana

    Articles like this certainly ignite some strong and passionate conversations regarding goaltending in Canada . It’s clear that the passion is alive and that there is a thirst for continued knowledge and development from the grass roots through to the National Hockey League.

    I can tell you all that there have been several goaltending coaches from the Pacific through to the Atlantic Ocean, members of hockey programs in every province, engaged in the development of the Canadian Goaltending Development Plan. Corey McNabb from Hockey Canada has assembled a team of coaches who have been working tirelessly to assemble a solid system that will prove to be of great benefit for our athletes. These coaches include goalie coaches with deep experience in the NHL, CHL, Pro Development Coaches that are among the most skilled and respected in the industry. In addition to quality people, quality experiences from visiting and working with countries that have had disciplined systems in place for many years such as Sweden and Finland. Sharing knowledge is one of the key contributing factors to creating a usable system, and more importantly being open to embrace additional concepts and removing the opinions, bias and judgement that naturally sets in.

    I would like to strongly encourage all of the minor hockey associations, coaches connected to them, and the parents that commenting on this post who feel that their child and association would benefit from the tools created within this program to contact their provincial branch and book their Goaltending Level 1 Clinic. If you are a goaltending coach, get involved, become familiar with the curriculum and get involved in teaching the “system” that so many are asking for in this article. We all know that there are different ways to teach a goaltender how to catch the puck but what the common thread is that this skill of catching is critical. Don’t get caught up in drills, or opinions…get caught up in the challenges of delivering results for the goaltenders.
    Hockey Canada’s Level 1 Goaltending is complete (and all the levels will always be a work in progress, improving as the game improves but will always be set on the very foundations that are needed by all goaltenders.) those basics need to be mastered as they lead into all of the more advanced and progressive tactics utilized in today’s game. Without them, the degradation or skills and the poor habits set in, fundamental holes are a habitually set and we begin to climb a hill made of sand. In order to gain “traction” we need to commit to mastering the basics and building off of them vs swinging on the “development pendulum” to the next highly skilled tactic used by today’s top netminders.

    We must remember that the best goaltenders in the world are who they are because they are proficient in all of the basic foundational skills, they are excellent athletes, highly intelligent, strong hockey / goalie IQ, and are committed to refining their game. I was blessed to spend a week working with terrific coaches and 9 of the top NHL goaltenders in the world. They are the very best at what they do because they are committed to finding the edge in their game, making any improvements, adjustments and refinements possible. They listen, learn, they ask questions and they are unafraid to commit to mastery. They have a ferocious work ethic in their own unique way and they move from decision to instinct seemlessly. (That is a lesson in itself.)

    Goaltending Level 2 is well on it’s way with all of the key concepts in place and will be a significant jump from basic goaltending coaching found in Level 1. Goaltenders and Goaltending coaches will appreciate Level 2 as this level embarks on the beginning of the high performance game, it’s structure, tactics, and intelligence. As goaltenders experience this level they will begin to realize this is a journey of mastery, discovery and challenges. It will stretch them to be better. Goaltending coaches will love this level, it’s organized in a way that will make teaching plans easier to understand, have an establish a theme, and deliver a goaltending product that athletes could appreciate and rely upon. It has intelligence built within the progressions and Level 3 is a whole other level beyond that.

    This is a huge project, a huge commitment, and a large geographical area to cover. The materials are vast and the sharing is massive. All of this starts with a lot of good people and the thing that makes Hockey Canada unique is the tremendous number of volunteers that make the massive machine work. Getting involved is where the solution begins…

    Everyone is capable of gathering knowledge, techniques and materials at the grass roots levels where the masses of goaltending live. Parents, coaches, associations and goalie coaches, can easily have access to Level 1 goaltending and begin putting the plan into action that everyone is asking for. Book your clinics and the facilitators will share with you that goaltenders need to be athletes, on ice exercises, off ice warm ups, training priorities, and the developmental priorities that you should be focusing on when starting in the position.

    Once that has taken place , Level 2 is delivered, but we need a base of people that will attend the clinics, gather the materials, implement a program In their association or team and impact a goaltender’s life

    Being a well rounded athlete in order to be a top level goaltender is common sense. Of course one needs to be fit, motivated , committed, and mentally tough. Of course if you play baseball, play catch or hit the ball your hand eye coordination will improve and translate into the net, but the perception is that many athletes are replacing that off season with spending more time in front of “screens” vs physical activities. They are no longer spending “an off season” working on skills, making the changes in their game or pushing for physical improvements or coordination. What needs to be encouraged is what is best for the development of that individual athlete. If you can’t skate and have not mastered your edges, if you can’t establish set position on the shot line, if you don’t understand the space that you have been challenged to cover, if you can’t manage your rebounds or recover, if you are out of breath or your legs burn 5 minutes into practice or ….you can’t catch ….it won’t improve to the level of mastery if you don’t spend time and focus on it. It’s that simple.

    In the minor hockey world, more emphasis on development vs the emphasis on winning. Having athlete sit on the bench and play 1/3 or 1/4 of the time will not keep athletes in the game …kids want to play. They have roughly 10-13 years in minor hockey to play and develop before they enter the business of hockey. If they don’t practice and play they won’t develop. Gaining access to these courses will bridge that gap.

    Finally we live in a computer world, I have many distance clients from minor hockey through to the professional ranks and I use simple and inexpensive programs to help them, guide them and communicate to many goaltender coaches throughout the hockey world to ensure athletes are receiving a consistent message and receiving timely information.

    All in all, the motivation behind the response is that we all begin to be apart of that solution and experience what has already been created. It will answer many of the things that are being asked or questioned in these articles.

    That is … the Solution to fixing Canadian Goaltending. I hope this helps.

    Reply
  12. Pasco Valana

    Articles like this certainly ignite some strong and passionate conversations regarding goaltending in Canada . It’s clear that the passion is alive and that there is a thirst for continued knowledge and development from the grass roots through to the National Hockey League.

    I can tell you all that there have been several goaltending coaches from the Pacific through to the Atlantic Ocean, members of hockey programs in every province, engaged in the development of the Canadian Goaltending Development Plan. Corey McNabb from Hockey Canada has assembled a team of coaches who have been working tirelessly to assemble a solid system that will prove to be of great benefit for our athletes. These coaches include goalie coaches with deep experience in the NHL, CHL, Pro Development Coaches and several goalie coaches from goaltending companies that are among the most skilled and respected in the industry. In addition to quality people, quality experiences from visiting and working with countries that have had disciplined systems in place for many years such as Sweden and Finland. Sharing knowledge is one of the key contributing factors to creating a usable system, and more importantly being open to embrace additional concepts and removing the opinions, bias and judgement that naturally sets in.

    I would like to strongly encourage all of the minor hockey associations, coaches connected to them, and the parents that commenting on this post who feel that their child and association would benefit from the tools created within this program to contact their provincial branch and book their Goaltending Level 1 Clinic. If you are a goaltending coach, get involved, become familiar with the curriculum and get involved in teaching the “system” that so many are asking for in this article. We all know that there are different ways to teach a goaltender how to catch the puck but what the common thread is that this skill of catching is critical. Don’t get caught up in drills, or opinions…get caught up in the challenges of delivering results for the goaltenders.
    Hockey Canada’s Level 1 Goaltending is complete (and all the levels will always be a work in progress, improving as the game improves but will always be set on the very foundations that are needed by all goaltenders.) those basics need to be mastered as they lead into all of the more advanced and progressive tactics utilized in today’s game. Without them, the degradation or skills and the poor habits set in, fundamental holes are a habitually set and we begin to climb a hill made of sand. In order to gain “traction” we need to commit to mastering the basics and building off of them vs swinging on the “development pendulum” to the next highly skilled tactic used by today’s top netminders.

    We must remember that the best goaltenders in the world are who they are because they are proficient in all of the basic foundational skills, they are excellent athletes, highly intelligent, strong hockey / goalie IQ, and are committed to refining their game. I was blessed to spend a week working with terrific coaches and 9 of the top NHL goaltenders in the world. They are the very best at what they do because they are committed to finding the edge in their game, making any improvements, adjustments and refinements possible. They listen, learn, they ask questions and they are unafraid to commit to mastery. They have a ferocious work ethic in their own unique way and they move from decision to instinct seemlessly. (That is a lesson in itself.)

    Goaltending Level 2 is well on it’s way with all of the key concepts in place and will be a significant jump from basic goaltending coaching found in Level 1. Goaltenders and Goaltending coaches will appreciate Level 2 as this level embarks on the beginning of the high performance game, it’s structure, tactics, and intelligence. As goaltenders experience this level they will begin to realize this is a journey of mastery, discovery and challenges. It will stretch them to be better. Goaltending coaches will love this level, it’s organized in a way that will make teaching plans easier to understand, have an establish a theme, and deliver a goaltending product that athletes could appreciate and rely upon. It has intelligence built within the progressions and Level 3 is a whole other level beyond that.

    This is a huge project, a huge commitment, and a large geographical area to cover. The materials are vast and the sharing is massive. All of this starts with a lot of good people and the thing that makes Hockey Canada unique is the tremendous number of volunteers that make the massive machine work. Getting involved is where the solution begins…

    Everyone is capable of gathering knowledge, techniques and materials at the grass roots levels where the masses of goaltending live. Parents, coaches, associations and goalie coaches, can easily have access to Level 1 goaltending and begin putting the plan into action that everyone is asking for. Book your clinics and the facilitators will share with you that goaltenders need to be athletes, on ice exercises, off ice warm ups, training priorities, and the developmental priorities that you should be focusing on when starting in the position.

    Once that has taken place , Level 2 is delivered, but we need a base of people that will attend the clinics, gather the materials, implement a program In their association or team and impact a goaltender’s life

    Being a well rounded athlete in order to be a top level goaltender is common sense. Of course one needs to be fit, motivated , committed, and mentally tough. Of course if you play baseball, play catch or hit the ball your hand eye coordination will improve and translate into the net, but the perception is that many athletes are replacing that off season with spending more time in front of “screens” vs physical activities. They are no longer spending “an off season” working on skills, making the changes in their game or pushing for physical improvements or coordination. What needs to be encouraged is what is best for the development of that individual athlete. If you can’t skate and have not mastered your edges, if you can’t establish set position on the shot line, if you don’t understand the space that you have been challenged to cover, if you can’t manage your rebounds or recover, if you are out of breath or your legs burn 5 minutes into practice or ….you can’t catch ….it won’t improve to the level of mastery if you don’t spend time and focus on it. It’s that simple.

    In the minor hockey world, more emphasis on development vs the emphasis on winning. Having athlete sit on the bench and play 1/3 or 1/4 of the time will not keep athletes in the game …kids want to play. They have roughly 10-13 years in minor hockey to play and develop before they enter the business of hockey. If they don’t practice and play they won’t develop. Gaining access to these courses will bridge that gap.

    Finally we live in a computer world, I have many distance clients from minor hockey through to the professional ranks and I use simple and inexpensive programs to help them, guide them and communicate to many goaltender coaches throughout the hockey world to ensure athletes are receiving a consistent message and receiving timely information.

    All in all, the motivation behind the response is that we all begin to be apart of that solution and experience what has already been created. It will answer many of the things that are being asked or questioned in these articles.

    That is … the Solution to fixing Canadian Goaltending. I hope this helps.

    Reply
    • Ice Surfer

      Any Goalie Coach clinics in Ontario? Is any new material being worked into the certification for head coaches?

      Reply
      • Pasco

        Absolutely, there are goaltending clinics available in the Ontario region, in fact the OHL is actively embracing this concept and has some terrific plans in delivering and supporting such a program.
        My recommendation is to contact Ontario Minor Hockey and make the request to set up some clinics in your region.
        If you run into a challenge please contact me personally and I will connect you with a representative in Ontario.

        Reply
  13. Tatonka

    How about the fact that the Canadian goalies were picked in the summer 6 months before the tournament, they were not the best goalies at the time they were sent to the JR”S. The world sends its best Canada sends its political picks. Hockey Canada centers its goaltending in the east and has over the last 10 years, We worry too much about the fact that a goalie was drafted high or projected high and we give them the net, there will be a trend of goalies that have had to battle bypassing the highly touted prospects because of the fact they have to battle to make a team and keep the spot. Not given it because they played on a great team when they were 6’2′ at 14 and couldn’t be beat.

    Reply
  14. Pasco

    Hi Tatonka. I am not sure if the questions were directed to me so I wanted to make sure that you were respected and an answer is provided. Thanks for your comments.

    I can share with you that the goaltenders who move through the selection process are carefully scrutinized and the athletes involved are reviewed by the scouting staff right through till the announcement day. I am not apart of the scouting process but have been witness as to the tireless efforts of the people involved in the process. Smart people, people involved from the Hockey Canada scouting staff and goaltending coach, the coaches of the individual teams, goaltending coaches from a variety of National Hockey League Teams, all provide feedback, their fitness, and their performances through to the competition. It is a tough job to project what a young athlete will do once facing the top players in the world, carrying the pressure of the nation on their shoulders and the pressures of continuous scrutiny as they move from Junior to Professional Hockey. That pressure can not be created in any format other than in the moment. The skills that they display at the camps, the comfort and predictability of their in-season team environment can be much different once you put on the jersey and face the top 10% of the shooters in the world’s in that age category.

    To respect your comments completely, it would be beneficial to standardize the goaltending evaluation process in Minor Hockey, identify the key and accurate statistical categories that would provide the best picture of what the “Top rated” goaltenders should understand and be able to execute at each level. That is a challenge because everyone believes that they have the best one, people in Canada that coach are passionate and really defend “their way.” That being said…..the Hockey Canada Goaltending Course is the first step to calibrating those necessities and the developmental techniques and tactices. In speaking and working with 2 of the very best that Sweden and Finland has in the goaltending coach category (Thomas Magnussen and Hunnu Nykvist)….it has been over 20 years since their implemented their system, and the production of Finnish Goaltenders such as : Lehtonen, Rask, Rinne, Niemi, Kiprusoff, Backstrom, Rynnas, Noronen, Kiviaho, Nittimaki, Toskala, Markkannen, Norrena, Ramo to name a few and Swedens’: Lundquist, Markstom, Lehner, Lack, Ullmark , Lindbergh, Enroth, Salo, Gustavson, Fasth, Lindbach, Dansk, Nihlstorp, Hedberg, Gustaffson. Having a system works, it is “True North” in the developmental process.

    Canada has also produced some pretty incredible goaltenders with an impressive list even without an official standardized system. Personally…I love developing goaltenders, and love the journey of developing assets for organizations through systems that I love and have shared within that environment. I am looking forward to the future of that system and the athletes, coaches and organizations that will benefit from the implementation.
    Thanks again
    P

    Reply

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