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Ninja Ankle Mobility Drill Helps With Reverse VH

Ninja Ankle Mobility Drill Helps With Reverse VH

Handy Drill for the Reverse VH

You will look like a Ninja when you do this one and what team doesn’t want a Ninja goaltender? Am I right?

Does anyone else feel like either their ankle or their knee is going to snap when they use the RVH or is it just the seven of you who email me every month to say that it does?

If you are nodding your head and your knee and ankle are sore just thinking about it, then I suggest you give this a try.

You will do about three on each leg and the key is to stay low in your hips – although we are focusing on the ankle here, you can see from the video that you are actually working through range with your knee and hip too, right?

So, stay low in your hips and make sure you keep that foot flat. Move smoothly from one position to the next (you are a Ninja after all).

That’s it! Enjoy.

Maria-Mountain-150x150Hockey strength and conditioning coach Maria Mountain, MSc specializes in off-ice training for hockey goalies. As the founder of www.GoalieTrainingPro.com and the owner of Revolution Sport Conditioning in London, Ontario, Maria has trained Olympic Gold medalists, a Stanley Cup Champ and athletes from MLB, NHL, AHL, CHL, CIS and more.

You can get a FREE 14-Day Flexibility program for goalies HERE!

About The Author

Maria Mountain M.Sc.

Hockey strength and conditioning coach Maria Mountain, MSc specializes in off-ice training for hockey goalies. As the founder of www.GoalieTrainingPro.com and the owner of Revolution Sport Conditioning in London, Ontario, Maria has trained Olympic Gold medalists, a Stanley Cup Champ and athletes from MLB, NHL, AHL, CHL, CIS and more. Try Maria's Goalie Stretch Solution today.

1 Comment

  1. Carl Potvin

    Hi Maria,

    Thanks for the video. For me the subject is “right on target” and I’m sure it also is for many of us.

    I suffered a “high ankle sprain” last spring and was just about to ask for a way to re-enforce the affected ankle. My dorsiflexion range of motion is back but I have to keep stretching at least few times a week to keep it there. I’ll try this 360 stretch sequence starting from tonight and let you know how it works for me.

    The main problem is getting the ankle stability back. Even after a lot of elastic band and stability work, it sometimes “gives”. I can push hard but abrupt stop and transition from shuffle to t-push on this side is still risky business. Is there a way to compensate for the remaining instability (as, for example, strengthening tight and hamstrings for a sprained knee ligament)?

    Carl