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Goalie Training: Plyometrics Add Explosiveness

Goalie Training: Plyometrics Add Explosiveness

Maria Mountain Plyometric TrainingIf you are looking to improve your explosiveness on the ice, then plyometric training will need to become a part of your life at some stage.

It is one of the pillars of speed and power training.

Despite the value of this training technique, however, using it at the wrong time or with the wrong dose can actually make you slower or worse leave you injured. So let’s look at how plyometrics make you more explosive and the initial steps to take on your journey to more speed and power.

How Do Plyos Work?

Essentially, plyometric training rapidly stretches a muscle prior to rapidly contracting it.

When you stretch a muscle rapidly, there is a reflexive contraction that is hard-wired into your brain. It is a protective mechanism, but if we time it right, this reflexive contraction, plus the recoil of the elastic elements in your muscle, plus your conscious contraction will give you more power production.

This is why you can jump higher if you drop down first to load your legs and go, rather than if you squat, pause and then jump.

The Ground Work

There is a lot of ground work to do before you even get to plyometric training so if you have not been working on your:

  • Mobility
  • Stability
  • Strength

Then forget about starting plyometrics right now. Get the foundation first.

If you have been working on those elements, then check out the exercises in the video below. This is where you should start with your plyometrics:

 

Key Points

  • Make sure your knee alignment on landing is perfect, otherwise you are not training the exact muscles you want to target, but you are also putting a lot of wear and tear through your knees which will eventually lead to pain.
  • Sit back in your hips as you land. The balls of your feet will land first, but your heels follow. You should not land on the balls of your feet with your heels off the ground.
  • You should be able to maintain a neutral back position as you land and absorb at your hips, knees and ankles. This does not mean your torso will be straight up and down, it will be angled forward, but it should stay in its neutral curve; no hunching over.
  • Your landing should be soft and quiet, like a Ninja, you should not shake the whole house.

How Much Volume?

This is the other place where coaches and trainers get off track with ploys. They assume if a little is good then more is better.

We typically limit our sets to four to eight foot contacts with 60-120 seconds of active rest in between sets (that can be core work, skill work or stabilization work). In a power workout we might do two to three exercises for two to three sets each.

The Rule

If you are trying to train for power using plyometric training, as soon as the quality of movement or the quality of power production diminishes, the exercise stops. Perhaps your rest interval was to short, try giving a little more rest – up to three-minutes.

If the technique or intensity is still sub-par, then the plyo session is done.

 

Happy training!

Dryland goalie trainer Maria MountainHockey strength and conditioning coach Maria Mountain, MSc specializes in off-ice training for hockey goalies. As the founder of www.GoalieTrainingPro.com and the owner of Revolution Sport Conditioning in London, Ontario, Maria has trained Olympic Gold medalists, a Stanley Cup Champ and athletes from MLB, NHL, AHL, CHL, CIS and more.

You can get a FREE 14-Day Flexibility program for goalies HERE!

About The Author

Maria Mountain M.Sc.

Hockey strength and conditioning coach Maria Mountain, MSc specializes in off-ice training for hockey goalies. As the founder of www.GoalieTrainingPro.com and the owner of Revolution Sport Conditioning in London, Ontario, Maria has trained Olympic Gold medalists, a Stanley Cup Champ and athletes from MLB, NHL, AHL, CHL, CIS and more. Try Maria's Goalie Stretch Solution today.