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Goalie Training: Removing Body’s Governor on Mobility

Goalie Training: Removing Body’s Governor on Mobility

Maria-Mountain-300x185Today’s technique is based on the premise of Dr. Andreo Spina’s Functional Range Conditioning, or the theory that the nervous system puts a governor on your mobility.

Do you think you could get more range if I lifted your leg over your head as you lay on the floor or if you just used your muscles to lift your leg over your head? Probably the situation where I am assisting would give more range of motion.

Why?

After all, you are strong enough to lift your own leg right? So it is not a strength issue. It is not a range of motion issue, either. It is an apprehension in the nervous system, a governor if you will.

Ever seen a little kid being coaxed by their Mom or Dad to jump off the ledge into the pool for the first time – ‘don’t worry, I’ll catch you’ and all that?

It can take a lot of coaxing can’t it? Until they do it once and then it seems like the kid cannot stop jump in the pool, swim to the ladder, jump in the pool and on it goes.

Your muscles are the same. Even if you stretch a lot and you have that flexibility, you may find yourself frustrated that the mobility is not there once you get onto the ice. Notice I said flexibility in the first part and mobility in the second. There is a distinction.

Flexibility is the range of motion you have about the joint. So in the scenario where I grab your leg and pull it up over your head – that is flexibility. Mobility on the other hand is the range of motion where you can generate force – your useable range of motion.

So how do we improve mobility, which is what you need on the ice? Without it all your stretching is futile.

Same as the kid standing on the ledge of the pool – we coax it. We coax it by generating force at the extreme end ranges of motion (and there is a technique for doing that, so wait until I explain it).

When you have generated force at the end of the range of motion (at the limit of the governor), the body gets the message that ‘hey, that wasn’t so bad, nothing bad happened, we can go to that range over and over again.’

It is a little (a lot) more complicated than that as it also affects tissue remodelling, but that is it in a nutshell.

Here’s exactly how to use this technique to improve your hip rotation. Remember that you should be feeling a stretch on the opening side of the joint and not a pinch or restriction on the closing side of the joint – it is all explained in the video:

Happy training.

Dryland goalie trainer Maria MountainHockey strength and conditioning coach Maria Mountain, MSc specializes in off-ice training for hockey goalies. As the founder of www.GoalieTrainingPro.com and the owner of Revolution Sport Conditioning in London, Ontario, Maria has trained Olympic Gold medalists, a Stanley Cup Champ and athletes from MLB, NHL, AHL, CHL, CIS and more.

You can get a FREE 14-Day Flexibility program for goalies HERE!

About The Author

Maria Mountain M.Sc.

Hockey strength and conditioning coach Maria Mountain, MSc specializes in off-ice training for hockey goalies. As the founder of www.GoalieTrainingPro.com and the owner of Revolution Sport Conditioning in London, Ontario, Maria has trained Olympic Gold medalists, a Stanley Cup Champ and athletes from MLB, NHL, AHL, CHL, CIS and more. Try Maria's Goalie Stretch Solution today.

2 Comments

  1. BeninLondon

    Best. Technique. Ever.
    I noticed a big improvement very quickly with this one, I am glad that it is in the Rapid Response Goalie Training Program now.

    • Maria Mountain

      Thanks Benin – glad you like it!
      Cheers,
      Maria