DeadArmOKDmainspreadJPEGFor something that really hasn’t been around for long, the sharp-angle save
technique that involves putting one pad up against the post and the other along the ice sure has a lot of names already.

Many weren’t repeatable for a young audience as the technique became over – and more often improperly – used in games.

Many call it VH, which is short for vertical-horizontal, a reference to the pad position. Some label it one-pad down. Others refer to it as one-knee down, or OKD.

Like the name, the technique has evolved over the last five years, with some coaches still teaching a glove position stacked on top of the post pad, while others now want that short-side arm wrapped around the post to provide more of an anchor.

No matter what they called it, however, it remained a pure blocking save, a stop that created a guaranteed rebound – and often one that was difficult to either track or cover as it lay in the goaltender’s skates.

Canadiens goalie coach Pierre Groulx highlights the keys of Dead Arm One-Knee Down in the January edition of InGoal Magazine.

Canadiens goalie coach Pierre Groulx highlights the keys of Dead Arm One-Knee Down in the January edition of InGoal Magazine.

All of Which is why Montreal Canadiens goaltending coach Pierre Groulx came up with another take on this save selection – and yes, with this modified technique comes another new name for it: Dead Arm One-Knee Down.

Contrary to the name, however, this new Dead Arm One-Knee Down technique is a designed to be a more active application of the original sharp-angle save, removing much of its locked-in feel. Yes, there remains a blocking component from the middle of the body to the post, but it allows the goaltender to react more freely off this position, while their opposite side – from the middle
of the body to the far glove/blocker and pad – stays reactive throughout.

In other words, it’s still a post seal, but one that’s been modified to make goalies more active.

Groulx walks goaltenders through the benefits and applications of Dead Arm One-Knee Down in the January edition of InGoal Magazine, including an exclusive video demonstration by Canadiens star goaltender Carey Price.

Be sure to read the entire article and see the video among 120 pages of goaltending gear, tips and feature stories, in the latest edition of InGoal Magazine.

DeadArmOKDmainspreadJPEG

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9 Responses to Canadiens coach teaches Dead Arm One-Knee Down (Carey Price Video)

  1. Sensei says:

    As an instructor of younger goalies the DA OKD is a more natural position and easier for the goalies to understand and perform. When I first tried to teach the VH (OKD) position it would take them several seconds just to get into the VH as it seemed awkward to them – especially with the glove stacked on the pad.

    Now when I teach it, I don’t even mention VH or OKD and just tell the young kids to do a half butterfly – which it actually is except with 1 leg remaining up (“because the post is in the way” I tell them). I don’t even say DA OKD, VH, or any other term that tends just to confuse the little guys. But they all know the butterfly so I just say do a “half butterfly beside the post” and they can get into the position right away. So they are learning the DA OKD without even knowing it. It is a more natural position.

  2. John E. says:

    Cool! Imma try it tonight!

  3. Jeff says:

    But the top corner is still visible, especially in the first part of the drills, and the angle being shot at is completely possible for players to pick that corner.
    Off the post in tight it seems to work well with a drop and block style.
    A big concern should also be directed at shorter goalies who can’t use their 6 ft x inch frame to get a shoulder on those pucks. Shorter guys still need to cover top ched.

  4. Jeff says:

    Though in looking into the article further it does make mention of my concerns … oh well:P

  5. Well written article and great ideas. Here in Sweden 9 out of 10 goalies would go with the reverse VH. Less rebounds, easier execution and easier to get into the butterfly if needed. (Like Price did in the 2nd sequence)
    We tend to move away from the OKD but still use it if the situation is right.

  6. steven says:

    What ever happened to the stand-up against the post – pads closed centered on the puck. No top corner -no short side opening – easy to react to the long side. Hall of Fame V- style goalies Glenn Hall and Tony Esposito used this along with Patrick Roy.

  7. sylvain says:

    What ever happened to the stand-up against the post – pads closed centered on the puck. No top corner -no short side opening – easy to react to the long side. Hall of Fame V- style goalies Glenn Hall and Tony Esposito used this along with Patrick Roy.

    …and follow with a kick save if the rebound goes near the opposite post!!!ouch!

  8. Bill Russell says:

    I grew up playing goal, before there were any goalie coaches, it was always preached at us to “stay up” to be able to stop a rebound shot if necessary. I truly enjoy watching the “evolution” of the game within the game, but wouldn’t it be more effective to stay upright for the sharp angle shot, therefore being able to move quickly to the open side for a possible rebound.

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